Waterford Pubs

Waterford, Co. Waterford

Beautifully situated on the River Suir, Waterford is one of Ireland's leading ports and harbours an enormous amount of container traffic to the south of England and to the Continent. So it comes as no surprise to learn that Waterford is a commercial city. What is surprising is the nature of one of Waterford's largest businesses - education.

As a town of many schools, both day and boarding, Waterford's streets are filled with an unusually large percentage of young faces, their freshness forming an interesting contrast to the ancient walls, crumbling ruins and storied past of the city.

It was in the eighteenth century that the city began to truly enjoy economic prosperity and from 1783 to 1851 produced the marvellous heavy glass that was to make Waterford's name famous around the world. Then, in 1851, as a result of the Great Famine and the ensuing depression that swept Ireland, the glassworks closed; for a century no one made so much as a drinking glass in Waterford.

In 1952, a new factory was opened and hand-blown and engraved Waterford is once again pleasing the world market. On average, the Waterford master blowers and engravers are probably the youngest in the world, having been apprenticed in their craft at the age of fifteen. This happy state of affairs has meant that Waterford men no longer need to emigrate to seek their fortunes but can prosper at home.

Glass is for sale at Knox's and at Palmer's in Waterford, and a great example of old Waterford crystal is on display in the Chamber of the Public Library in the form of a magical chandelier.

The Auld Stand, John Street

A corner pub done in the classic London style, with good bar food and a restaurant upstairs.

T. & H. Doolin, George Street

Doolin's is just off the pedestrian mall where you can pleasure your eye with some nicely restored eighteenth century buildings. You'll think you're in a country bar here in this intimate pub. Two rooms side by side, dimly lit and timbered. A friendly crowd. Good folk sessions.



Jordan's American Bar, The Quay

Take a walk along the Quay past the famous Reginald's Tower and the amusing shops until you reach this docker's pub that has beautifully withstood the test of time and the winds of fashion.

The tiny bar is most unusual. Appropriately, considering the harbour-side location, it feels rather like the snug cabin of a boat. The eighteenth century wood wall trim, inset drawers and clock are in ship-shape condition, as is the little wooden guard rail around the edges of the somewhat high bar. The entrance door has a picture of an American eagle holding a flag and inside, all along the top moulding of the wall, is a collection of old American car licence plates. No one seems to know why, however.

Dart games some evenings.

Beautifully situated on the River Suir, Waterford is one of Ireland's leading ports and harbours an enormous amount of container traffic to the south of England and to the Continent.

From the Appletree Press title: The Irish Pub Guide.
Also from Appletree: Irish Pub Songs.